You Suck — Why Most Professional Artists Aren’t Professionals

The other day my Nashville music friend Tommy threw out a post on Facebook that got me (and many others) pondering. He said, basically, “What should I do, spend more time practicing on becoming the best guitar player (he already is) or settle for mediocrity by getting myself a tat sleeve, mohawk and a tit ring and pretend being a cool music hipster?”

Here was my response…

“The real answer is simple. Musicians are not financially successful because they either suck or they don’t treat their brand and craft like a consumer business (that requires certain skills in management, finance, operations and most of all marketing/sales).

“Now if you get the tit ring — which I think would look devilishly handsome on you — write that down on a piece of paper and roll it up and shove into said tit ring to keep close to your heart. Love, Uncle Phil”

Of course all of this was written in good fun but the reality is deadly serious: most artists suck at self-promotion. It’s not in their NDA. Period. And if they don’t suck at the marketing side, they probably suck at the finance or operations side. Period period.

This sounds harsh but it’s true, and most artists will admit it. But there are examples for artists to follow. Two of them are my friends Bonnie Block, whose photography hangs on the hallowed walls of the Smithsonian Institure, and Paul Baloche, who’s a regular performer at London’s storied Royal Albert Hall (yes, that place made famous by the Beatles) and quite possibly the most prolific songwriter in the history of the modern christian church.

What they both do extremely well is not rocket science. First, they know their audience like family. They know what they want and need, and they dish it to them to overflowing. Second, they have surrounded themselves with smart people who know the other crucial parts of their business where they lack expertise, and they reward them well for it. Third, they have applied the SmoothStone Partners recipe for artistic success—SST, which stands for Science, Sport and Theater.

For any professional marketing effort to be successful you must work the numbers to achieve an acceptable ROI. This relates to your fixed and variable costs, projected income and conversion rates—the specific number of prospects you must reach to convert them to customers and ultimately to become high-profit, lifelong brand loyalists. It’s primarily a left brain function. That’s Science.

To achieve conquest you must engage in fierce competitive battle in gain market share. You must know your competitor’s weaknesses, your customers’ pain points and your unique value proposition—then apply it with abandon. You play to win. That’s Sport.

To get the attention of your audience, to turn their heads in a crowded sea of suspects you must have a wow factor. You must be different, memorable, and likeable. That often requires an element of drama. That’s Theater.

By using these three disciples—science, sport and theater—SmoothStone Partners battle hand in hand, side by side with our clients to achieve a single objective: market preeminence, whether in your neighborhood or around the globe.

Not everyone can be a Bonnie or Paul, but you can still make a six figure income by applying the key principles of professional success to your God-given craft.

And if you go for the tat sleeve or tit ring, it just might take you to a seven figure income.

Rock on.

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